How is Attitude Impacting Your Job Search?

July 27th, 2018

You may be showing up for interviews with a bright smile and responding to questions with a blast of sunshine (“I loved my last job! I’m not in it for the money! My weakness is that I work too hard!”) and you may be throwing yourself into every networking opportunity with an eager handshake and a level of enthusiasm that peels paint from the walls. But if you aren’t finding success with your search process, your attitude could still be to blame. Here’s why, and here are a few tips on what to do about it.

The corporate world is full of fakery— But that doesn’t mean you have to be.

The job search process and the corporate world are full of manufactured smiles and cheerful small talk. Positive language fills every room and people generally try not to reveal their true feelings or upset each other, at least on the surface. But it’s wise to recognize the difference between cheerful expressions and genuine satisfaction. If a job isn’t right for you, it isn’t right for you. If the culture isn’t appealing, if the salary doesn’t meet your requirements, if the business model doesn’t reflect your values, walk away. Smile if you wish, but don’t be taken in by your own smiles, and don’t fall for your own positive chatter. A bad deal is bad deal. A mismatch is a mismatch. When the answer is no, it’s no.

Honesty is the key to real positivity.

If an employer wants a candidate who can code in HTML or speak Italian and you can’t do these things, be honest. Honesty—even if it sounds a little negative—will get you where you need to go faster. When your current goals no longer work for you, drop them. When your actions aren’t helping you, give them up. Sometimes “losing” is winning, and vice versa. Unhappy careers (and lives) often start with people frantically and compulsively chasing things they don’t really want.

Open communication matters.

If you have a suspicion or a doubt, share it. If you have a question, ask. Be open with your potential employers and expect them to be open with you. Again, it does no good to omit a burning question that could help you make an important life decision (And for the record, it doesn’t impress anyone.)

Shake off setbacks.

In our modern world, most of what we call “setbacks” really aren’t. A few generations ago, for example, a rejected resume or a layoff might have been considered a serious disappointment or a career “failure”. But this isn’t the case anymore. Most candidates submit many resumes before landing an interview, and most people have been laid off at least once (often multiple times) by the mid-career level. The average employee maintains a job for about 2.4 years (certainly not for life), and mid-career pivots are far more common now than they were for our parents. Don’t let meaningless upsets get you down.

For more on how to make sure your “positive” attitude is truly positive, turn to the career management team at PSU.

Evaluating a Candidate’s Teamwork Skills

July 13th, 2018

You probably mentioned in your job post that you’re looking for a “team player”, and after publishing your post, you’re probably receiving plenty of resumes from candidates who describe themselves using this term. Chances are, just about every application you receive will use the word “team” at least once, and maybe several times. “Team players” are everywhere. And of course there’s no universal consensus on what this term actually means. So how can you make sure you’re selecting candidates who hold the specific team skills you’re looking for? Here are a few quick tips.

Ask, then check for alignment.

During the interview, ask your candidate to tell you a story. For example, try: “Tell me about a time on the job when you had to demonstrate team skills,” or: “Tell me a story that demonstrates what teamwork means to you.” Let the candidate think for a minute before answering, and compare what she says with your own definition of teamwork. See how well they line up.

Be clear, not vague.

Vague statements might seem safe and appealing in the interview setting, but they really just waste your time and contribute to bad decision making on both sides of the table. As far as possible, be clear and honest with your candidate. If you want someone who will keep quiet about company wrongdoing and execute questionable orders obediently, don’t call this “teamwork”. Call it something else. If you want a candidate who will work long hours and show up on weekends, don’t say you want a “team player”. Say you need someone who can work long hours and show up on weekends.

Teamwork may or may not make the dream work.

How will dedication to a “team” help your candidate, the company, or both? Some employers staff positions in the face of long term projects that require an extended investment, and they need candidates who are willing to stay in their seats for the next several years. Energetic, ambitious candidates who are contributing to teams left and right and working their way quickly up the ladder may not want to park here for very long. They’re great with teams, and their contributions are invaluable…but when the winds change and it’s time to move on, they shift team loyalties as well. Will this kind of teamwork work for you? If not, find out now. If so, make sure your ambitious candidate knows that staying on board for a while will be worth the sacrifice.

For more on how to define “teamwork” and “team players” for your candidate, your hiring partners, your recruiter and yourself, reaching to staffing experts at PSU.

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