Why You Should Work With a Recruiter

October 26th, 2018

You may be searching for a new job and not finding success just yet. Or you may be scouring the market and not finding a job match that’s quite right for you. Or you may be experiencing a little bit of both. In any case, if you haven’t started working with a professional recruiter, now may be a great time to start. A recruiter can add energy and focus to your search, and their years on the job and deep experience with searches just like yours can help you reach heights you wouldn’t be able to reach on your own. Here’s how.

Recruiters can find job openings you can’t find on your own

Not every job is publicly posted on a website you happen to use. And no matter how wide your social network may be, your recruiter’s network is wider AND more relevant to your job search. Most recruiters have been in the business for a long time. They can access and open doors you may not even be able to see.

Recruiters know their clients better than you do

You may find an open job with your target company … but other than the information you find online, you don’t know very much about the company, or the hiring manager, at all. Here’s a tip: Your recruiter does. They can help you make a connection with a certain employer by highlighting your most relevant accomplishments and skills.

Recruiters can advocate for you

Advocating for yourself is a necessary skill during your job search, but it’s not easy. Making your own personal sales pitch will always be an uphill climb. When you have others who speak for you and can provide support and testimonials, you move from the stairs to the escalator. Your recruiter can present you to their clients and make sure they see your best qualities.

Recruiters can steer you away from trouble and wasted time

If you’re barking up the wrong tree, or chasing a job that just isn’t a match, your recruiter can often see it before you do. Sometimes the salary will be far too low. Or the advancement opportunities won’t take you where you’d like to go. Or the employers need a skill set you simply don’t have. Your recruiter can find you something better.

Recruiters can help you polish your resume

When your recruiter gives you advice about your resume, you’re wise to take it. Again, they know what your target employers are looking for and what they need to see.

For more on how to connect with a recruiter and boost your job search, turn to the experts at PSU.

 

Interviewing for Soft Skills

October 12th, 2018

Assessing a candidate’s “hard skills” during an interview can be fairly straightforward (depending on the circumstances). Since hard skills typically include demonstrable abilities or simple facts, you can always ask the candidate to demonstrate the skill or ask if they possess it. Can you speak a foreign language? Did you win this award? Are you certified in this subject area? Have you held this role before? Easy. How you weigh the candidate’s response is up to you, but by asking the question, you place the ball in their court.

By contrast, soft skills can more difficult to assess. Asking a candidate direct questions in this area won’t get you very far. For example, “Are you easy to work with?”, “Are you a team player?” and “Do you like to work hard?” are silly questions, because the answer will always be yes. Try these moves instead.

Ask for stories.

If you’re looking for leadership, ask your candidate to describe an episode in which they were required to demonstrate leadership under challenging circumstances. If you’re looking for resilience, ask the candidate to describe a time they failed at something. What happened and what did they learn? If you’re looking for teamwork, conflict resolution or negotiation skill, ask for stories that can give you a sense of these traits. As the candidate responds, read between the lines.

Consider the interview a stress test.

Never bully, intimidate or behave rudely to a candidate—that goes without saying. But keep in mind that all interviews, no matter how friendly and professional, are inherently stressful. Monitor the candidate’s response to this baseline stress. Pay attention to body language (are they twitching and sweating?) and pay attention to how the candidate bounces back from the little hiccups of the process (awkward pauses, minor disagreements, misunderstandings).

Ask questions with no wrong answers.

Questions with clear right answers (like “Are you a hard worker?”) just waste time. But when all answers are equally valid, the truth can come to the surface. Try either/or questions like these: “Are you more of an introvert or an extrovert?” “Do you prefer leadership or team roles?” “If you have to choose between turning in excellent work OR meeting a deadline, which do you usually choose?”

Share some unpopular aspects of the job.

Tell your candidate about some of the more difficult, unpleasant, tedious, disgusting, boring, frustrating or unglamorous aspects of the job they’re targeting; then observe their response. A cringe followed by a long silence can speak volumes. So can a candidate who lights up and leans forward. Cleaning grease traps, dealing with angry customers, spending lonely days on the road and working odd hours are daunting to most people. If your candidate isn’t one of them, that’s a good sign.

For more on how to choose the best candidates for your position, talk to the team at PSU.

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