How to Impress Employers During Your Interview

November 23rd, 2018

When you step in the door for your interview, you want to reassure the employer that you’re trustworthy, honest, hardworking and qualified. But every other candidate in line for the role will also be aiming for the same goals. So, you don’t want to just meet that bar of expectation; you want to soar over it! To truly stand out, you’ll have to blow your employers away. You’ll have to provide more than the minimum and make a truly lasting impression. Here’s how.

Bring everything you need.

When something comes up during the conversation about your past projects, your references or just the everyday details of your resume, will you be ready? Employers are typically impressed by candidates who can just reach into their portfolio folder—or phone—and produce the item, evidence or visual aide in question. It’s a polished gesture that makes you come off as ultra-prepared.

Ask the right questions.

Most employers will provide you with a chance at the end of the interview to ask your own questions about the role, the company or anything you choose. So, ask questions that elevate your profile. Don’t just say “No, but if I have any questions later, I’ll contact you.” Instead, ask about room for advancement. Ask if this job will provide you with the training or exposure you need to advance your career. Ask anything that’s on your mind and do it boldly.

Demonstrate you’ve done some research.

Of course, you can also simply just tell your employers you’ve been spending some time online learning about the company (not many candidates do this, especially at the entry level, so this move alone can set you apart). But it’s also nice to show—not just tell—when you share what you’ve learned and how you processed that information. Based on what you independently discovered, how would you describe this company’s needs, and how are you uniquely prepared to meet those needs? How can you contribute in a positive way to the better aspects of this company’s brand and reputation? How can you alleviate the negative aspects? How can you help this team meet its long- and short-term goals?

Think, talk and listen at the same time.

Most candidates can do one of these. Many can do two or three of them as the moment requires. But how many candidates can listen to what the interviewer says, process that information, and provide intelligent insights, responses and contributions to the conversation at the same time? Surprisingly few. Intelligent conversation is an art form, and it’s a task that happens to be especially difficult during times of anxiety or pressure. If you can stay poised, smart, verbal and tuned in, let it show. You won’t be forgotten.

For more on how to impress your interviewers and land the job you need, turn to the staffing pros at PSU.

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