Researching a Potential Employer? Here’s What to Look for.

December 20th, 2019

Before you get dressed and ready to roll on the day of your job interview, you’ll want to spend some time researching the company so that you can impress your potential managers with your knowledge of the organization, its culture, and your potential role here. But AFTER the interview, when you have an offer in hand, and you need to decide whether to sign on the line, your research matters even more.

Here are a few things you’ll want to search for at each stage of the process. Remember: smart career management always starts with planning, preparation, and informed decisions.

What do these managers admire, and what qualities do they prize?

To answer questions like these, start by scrutinizing the job post. Read between the lines and look for words or phrases that appear more than once.  Then go online and look for the kinds of words and cultural expressions the company likes to associate with its brand. If, for example, you’re researching a service provider and you see lots of references to speed and quick response times, that’s a signal. If you see a few references to speedy service but lots of emphasis on quality work or a personal touch, make a note of it. In the second case, your managers may prefer an employee who gets things right over one who does things fast.

How does the company make money?

Do your best to understand the company’s business model fully. In our modern world, that can sometimes take a close look and a little effort. Media organizations often make money by selling ads, not delivering information. Bulk retailers often make money selling subscriptions and memberships, not necessarily products. Insurance providers, solutions architects, and third-party agencies often have business models and departmental structures that are not clear at a glance. A little homework can help you impress.

Does this company share your values?

There are few things more disheartening then accepting a job and finding out only months or years later that you’ve signed on with a company that’s committed to personal values you don’t share. If you aren’t sure where this organization and its leadership stand on the issues that matter most to you, from the specific (like politics) to the general (like kindness, giving back, or community service), consult the internet. Scrolling through search results and news articles can give you a sense of what – if anything – this company stands for beyond making money for its shareholders.

Understand the organization you’re dealing with, what you can offer them, and what they can provide you with. For help, turn to the career management team at PSU.

Utilize Your Talent Pool to Save Money

December 13th, 2019

Do you maintain an active “talent pool”? Do your hiring managers know exactly where to turn when they have an open position to fill? Are you proactively pursuing excellent candidates, or are you waiting until your positions open and then accepting a resume from whoever happens to stumble upon your job posts?

Smart employers recognize that recruiting and hiring are not one-time events. Staffing is an ongoing process, so when you think about selecting new candidates, stay focused on “when” not “if.” Maintaining a talent pool can help you come out ahead when it’s time to bring a talented employee on board. Here’s how to take action.

Plan way ahead.

Take a strategic look at your position pipeline. At least a year in advance, recognize who’s retiring, who’s facing a promotion, and who’s about to go and leave a valued position unoccupied. If you know, you’ll need to staff those positions soon, and you don’t see a steady stream of internal candidates who can step comfortably into those roles, be ready to turn to outside contenders.

Value passive talent.

Many of the best outside candidates for the role share one common trait: they aren’t actively seeking new jobs. Their feelers are out, and they’ll consider new opportunities that could advance their careers, but in the meantime, they’re happy where they are. They’re employed and fine. They have all they need. But their Linkedin profile settings may indicate that they’re open to new offers, or they may have resumes posted on job search sites. These are the candidates you want in your talent pool.

Appreciate active talent (and be grateful).

When active applicants submit resumes, show respect and appreciation for their interest, even if you can’t offer them a position right now. Active candidates are those who are between jobs or searching for a new position right now, and for this group, time is a factor. If you can’t hire them, someone else will soon, but that’s no reason to let them disappear. Keep their names on file and deliver a message of goodwill and interest in a long-term positive relationship. Let them know that you’d like to hear from them as soon as they return to the market.

Prepare a plan for talented applicants you can’t hire immediately.

You want Candidate A to work for you. But she has a job, she’s not desperate, and she’s being (or has been) courted by other employers. Also, the position you want her to step into is currently occupied by someone who won’t leave for another six weeks. What to do? Keep her name in your talent pool! When the moment arrives, you’ll be ready to make the call and deliver the offer that will grab her attention.

For more on how to build and maintain a staff of the most talented workers in your area, rely on the staffing pros at PSU.

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