5 Ways to Make Your Job Feel More Rewarding

January 24th, 2020

You’ve been avoiding the truth for a while now, but it’s time to face facts: Your job just isn’t sparking your interest anymore. You trudge in every day because you have to and because you’re entrenched in your routine (and dependent on your paycheck), but the passion for your work is gone. What now?

Here are five simple things you can do to make your job feel more rewarding on a day-to-day basis.

Start drawing a map to the door.

In 2020, there’s no cultural or societal reason—and usually no personal benefit – involved in keeping the same job for more than five years if the job doesn’t feel rewarding anymore. Studies show that “job hopping,” once considered a negative behavior, actually leads to much higher lifetime salaries and more enjoyable careers. Don’t assume you’re impressing anyone by staying beyond your expiration date. If that date is on the horizon, it’s time to get excited about planning for what comes next.

Look at how far you’ve come.

The passion that brought you here a few years ago may not reflect your current personality and goals. And that’s okay. In fact, it’s better than okay; it’s a sign that you’re alive, growing, and evolving as a person. If you swept in the door with stars in your eyes and a genuine desire to (fill in the blank), it’s okay if that desire is no longer part of who you are. Don’t try to relight an old flame. Instead, figure out what lights you up NOW. Embrace the present and get ready to chart a new path.

Help someone else.

Look around at the interns and entry-level coworkers in your workplace and ask yourself if you’d like to become a mentor. Can you help one of these youngsters learn what you know and gain your skill sets? Sometimes just talking and teaching someone else can remind you of the things you once loved about this work.

Ask for a new project.

If you aren’t quite ready to leave the company or the industry just yet, ask your managers if you can take on a new project, ideally an initiative you can shape from the ground up and call your own. A sense of empowerment and ownership may make you feel like you’re regaining control over your days.

Ask for a shift in your tasks and responsibilities.

If there’s some aspect of your job that grinds you down, something you find especially burdensome or tedious, see if there’s a way to cut that aspect out of your life. This may be easier if you’ve paid your dues and dedicated yourself to this task long enough to reasonably hand it off. Speak your mind, explain what you need, and see what happens.

For more on how to retake the steering wheel of your career, and regain your lost passion, talk to the job management experts at PSU.

Is Your Hiring Process Scaring Talent Away?

January 17th, 2020

Like it or not, the hiring process is a two-way street. Much like dating, sizing up the other person, and assessing your feelings for them will only get you halfway to the finish line. You’ll also have to win the person over, which may mean treating them with respect, enjoying their company, showing interest and curiosity as you ask them questions, and giving them the benefit of the doubt as they answer.

If you don’t take these steps and you don’t work hard to show what you have to offer, you may decide the candidate is simply perfect… the minute before they wander away. Keep these tips in mind, and you’ll be more likely to attract talent instead of scaring great candidates off.

Be the first to tackle every task.

Reach out first. Proactively contact great candidates (through a recruiter or search service), and make the interview process easy. Start with a phone call and move from there to an in-person meeting. Keep both short. Pay for the candidate’s travel. Be on time. Greet the candidate warmly. Take responsibility for breaking the ice and keep the conversation flowing. Make them comfortable; don’t expect them to do that for you.

Be polite when it comes to timelines.

There’s no need to rush your decision, but be polite when your candidate asks about it. Never rudely shut down applicants who call for an update, and don’t curtly forbid this behavior from the start. Candidates have a right to plan out their lives. To the best of your ability, give them the information they need. If you can’t tell them anything, say so professionally.

Keep the tone of the interview in context.

Always remember the goals of the interview process and keep the tone in line with those goals. An interview should never be confused with a trial. And it isn’t a cross-examination, either. Don’t try to poke holes in your candidate’s statements as if you’re trying to catch him or her in a lie. Don’t corner or bait candidates (even if you’re doing it politely), and don’t draw details from their background and hold them up as accusations. (“It says here you majored in biology. What does that have to do with a company like ours?”). Even the most subtle antagonistic behavior can push a candidate to accept an offer elsewhere.

Treat the candidate as you would wish to be treated.

Ask if they had trouble finding the venue. Make sure they know how to leave the building after they exit your office. Offer them a comfortable seat. Find an interview area free of distractions, noises, smells, and interruptions. Show off a little by dressing well, preparing in advance, and choosing a venue that showcases the best aspects of your company. Leave a positive impression, even if you don’t ultimately hire the person.

For more on how to form a positive relationship during every interview, reach out to the staffing pros at PSU.

©Year Personnel Services Unlimited, Inc.
All Rights Reserved. Site Credits.