How to Make Mondays More Productive

July 30th, 2020

Mondays are tough. Everybody knows this. And for the most part, everybody knows why. We all just recognize and accept that transitions are difficult and the shift in rhythm from unstructured to structured time can be jarring. The alarm clock sounds more harsh and unbearable when you haven’t heard its ring in a few days, and the same can be said of your boss’s voice. But that’s no reason to let Mondays get your down. And it’s certainly no reason to write the day off and simply accept that you’re unlikely to get much done.

Here are a few ways to make your uncomfortable day a little more productive.

Do your Monday self a few favors on Friday.

Friday-You can make life easier for Monday-You with a few kind gestures that go a long way. Tidy up your workspace before you leave, so you can come in fresh. Create a to-do list for your Monday self so she has a road map throughout the day and doesn’t have to start out in a fog. You can even use post-its (or your own personal system) to visually prepare her for the tasks ahead and minimize her cognitive load as much as possible. She’ll thank you for it, I promise.

Avoid sleeping in…too much.

Of course there’s no need to bolt out of bed on a sub-zero Saturday morning for no reason. But if you try, at least a little, to gently bring yourself into a waking state at about the same time on weekends as you do on weekdays, the transition back and forth will be easier on your mental health.

Don’t give in.

Mondays (unsurprisingly) are the day people most often contemplate quitting their jobs. That’s fine, and if you don’t like your job, you certainly SHOULD quit (try to have another one lined up when you do). But don’t quit, or contemplate it, just because it’s hard to get up and get busy after the weekend. Remind yourself of all of the reasons why you like working here and take some time to have a Monday chat with the coworkers you enjoy the most.

For more on how to stay on track and focused, no matter the day of the week, turn to the career management team at PSU.

What are Your Job Descriptions Saying about Your Company?

July 15th, 2020

If your job descriptions are working, here’s how you can tell: the candidates who line up to submit resumes are generally qualified for the role and a good personality match for the organization. If your job posts are not working, you can also tell: The candidates who respond to your posts are generally not the kinds of candidates you’re excited to hire…if anyone applies at all.

So how can you receive more of the first type of response and less of the second? First, check your job descriptions and make sure they’re sending a message that’s accurate, positive, and reaching the right ears.

Here are a few tips that can help with your assessment.

Make sure your requirements are accurate and logical.

Say you’re hiring a candidate for an entry-level, relatively menial role that most people in the industry view as a stepping stone or a way in the door. If you require “10+” years of experience, how will that come across? First, you’ll confuse your reader, and the post will sound like it was written by a machine, not a human being who really cares about the future of the role. Second, the best candidates will move on without applying, since they either have 10 years of experience (but are looking for something more advanced) or they’re perfect for an entry-level role (but lack ten years of experience). The candidates who decide to apply may have the worst of both.

Don’t douse your descriptions with meaningless words.

Make sure your descriptions are readable and authentic. If you read your descriptions and see sentences like: “We’re looking for a real go-getter with a can-do attitude”, or: “We’re a team of self-starters with passion, creativity, and the willingness to go the extra mile”, take them out. these phrases don’t mean anything, and adding clutter to your post makes it harder for candidates to assess the role and decide to apply. Include the specific skills you want, and explain what you have to offer that other companies may not have. That’s all.

Don’t be sketchy.

Your company may not be the most fun place to work; not every company is. But as you take the first steps toward a relationship with a new hire, stay honest and aboveboard. Don’t imply that you’re looking for candidates of a certain age, gender, race or demographic. Delete phrases like “We’re a youthful, high energy company and we want a candidate who will stay with us for the long haul” since that suggests you plan to overlook older workers. Don’t lie about the responsibilities of the job or the salary, ever. Don’t lie about what the company does. Be clear and honest about what you want, and you’ll be more likely to get it. For more on how to attract and retain top candidates, turn to the experts at PSU.

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