Is your Interview Going South? Turn it Around with These Tips!

August 21st, 2020

Your interview started out strong! Or at least, it started out fine. After brief introductions and small talk, you and your interviewer started getting into the substance of the conversation and at around that point, something went wrong. Maybe you made a joke that fell flat. Or maybe your interviewer pointed out a missing or concerning detail from your resume. Maybe a misunderstanding or miscommunication has left you feeling flustered and off-center. What should you do now? If you really want to be considered for the role, here are a few moves that can help you find your bearings and bring the session back on track.

Clarify, clarify, clarify.

If you aren’t sure what happened or you don’t know exactly why your interviewer’s friendly smile turned into a frosty frown, it’s okay to ask. This is especially true if you’re sure the situation isn’t going to improve on its own. Don’t sit there floundering; just clear the air. It’s perfectly okay to ask questions like “Did I say something confusing?” or “Would you like to know more about that part of my background?” or even, “I can see you’re concerned about that part of my past. Can I answer your questions and put your concerns to rest?” Don’t become defensive; just ask questions and get your bearings.

Don’t make offers or concessions until you’re ready.

If you say you’re not interested in travel and the interviewer tells you this job will require you to be on the road, don’t just assume the interview is over. And don’t trip over yourself rushing to change your position; if you don’t like travel, you don’t like travel. Instead, move past that detail and focus on other skill areas and qualifications you have to offer. The interviewer may be willing to meet you halfway. But to find out, you’ll need to stay calm and self-possessed.

If you flubbed an answer, move on.

Your interviewer asked you a question to assess your industry knowledge, and you fumbled. Your brain and sense of recall just would cooperate, and you faceplanted in a way that made you look underqualified—or worse. This situation is more common than you might think; even experts sometimes flail when they’re on the spot and under pressure. What matters next is how you handle the next several seconds, and you need to rise to the moment. Let the question go. It’s gone. Now focus on your dignity, your self-confidence, and your ability to take yourself lightly. Don’t scramble to explain why you flubbed, or worse, claim you didn’t flub. Don’t inspire pity by dramatically beating yourself up. And certainly don’t attack or belittle the question. Just smile and ask for the next one. We all fall down. What matters is how quickly and gracefully we get back up.

For more on how to sail through a harrowing interview with your professionalism and confidence intact, turn to the career growth experts at PSU.

How to Wrap Up a Dead End Interview

August 14th, 2020

Not every interview leads to a successful connection and a promising new job. In fact, sometimes it becomes clear that the job is a mismatch even before the interview session is over. If your interviewer or would-be employer brings up a non-negotiable deal-breaker or reveals some information that takes the job off your list, what should you do?

Here are a few considerations to keep in mind.

Don’t just head for the door (unless you have a good reason)

You may not want the job, but there’s nothing wrong with maintaining goodwill and positive relationships, especially if your industry is self-contained and you may run into some of these people again someday. Even if you spend another twenty minutes engaged in a go-nowhere conversation, that’s a small price to pay to keep doors open for yourself at some unknown point in the future. If it feels like a polite and appropriate thing to say, explain why you don’t feel inclined to move forward with the role. Maybe the commute is too far or the salary too low. Give the employers a chance to speak if they might be able to raise the offer or allow you to work remotely. If they aren’t interested, politely explain that the job isn’t for you and give them the chance to say goodbye first.

If you have a good reason, leave immediately.

Sometimes a bad interview can be like a bad date; if you aren’t comfortable, just go. Otherwise, things won’t likely get better and they may get much worse. If your interviewer is rude, combative, disrespectful, or seems inclined to poke holes in your background or question your motives or integrity, simply state that you don’t see a future together, say thank you, and leave. Don’t wait for permission. This type of interaction almost never ends in a long and productive employment tenure. You haven’t given or implied any promises yet, and you don’t owe the interviewer another moment of your time.

If you’re on the fence, clear the air before you make a decision.

If your interviewer says something that seems ambiguous or hard to interpret, just ask for clarification. If he says something that implies that the business doesn’t share your values, ask him to explain the statement. If she says something that indicates the job isn’t what was advertised, or the terms of the position or the business model don’t work for you, don’t just run out the door—you might be losing out on an opportunity because of a simple misunderstanding. Get the truth. Then pause for at least five full seconds (literally count them—this will give your employer time to think and react as well). Then you can go.

If you don’t want the job, save yourself some time and trouble and head for the door. But do so politely and professionally, and you’ll walk out with no regrets. Turn to the experts at PSU for guidance.

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