Is Your Team Following These Commonly Broken Safety Rules?

June 25th, 2021

Safety rules are an important part of work, life, productivity and success for any company that operates an active non-office workplace. (Offices can be dangerous too, of course, but that’s a subject for another post.) If your business requires the use of a warehouse, manufacturing facility, shipping and receiving area, press, cold storage, or any other place where the unexpected can and will happen, make sure these frequently ignored safety rules are actively enforced.

Hard hats and protective coverings.

Hard hats, safety goggles, masks, and other items that slip easily on and off without interfering with regular clothing can provide a powerful layer of protection. But only if employees can be bothered to grab and apply them when it matters. Far too often, they can’t and don’t. Once a few managers get away with casting aside this rule, it becomes acceptable for rank-and-file employees to do so also. And since what we wear (or don’t wear) can have a strong influence on social cohesion, a little bit of peer pressure can easily expose employees to grievous harm, and the company to expensive claims. Think a bunch of tough factory workers don’t care how they look and always put responsibility and safety first? Think again.

Certification-only machinery.

If an employee hasn’t received official (and completed!) training on the forklift, meat slicer, box crusher, or chromatograph, they shouldn’t use it. End of story. It doesn’t matter if deadlines are looming and certified operators aren’t present. Employees usually bend this rule when pressured to help “get things done” and motivated to impress their bosses by “pitching in”. Don’t let this tendency work its way into your workplace culture.

No entry zones.

No entry means no entry, even if the forbidden area provides a shortcut between one frequently used area and another. Find a way to re-route foot traffic or physically close the area off to those without keys or digital access cards. If a “no-entry” sign is placed at the entrance and it doesn’t really need to be there, take it down. Otherwise, signs in more important areas are likely to be ignored.

Floor protection measures.

Wet and slippery floors can be a leading cause of accidents and problems in the workplace, and these incidents and tragedies are often entirely avoidable. Protect indoor-outdoor thresholds with carpets or rubber floor coverings, and keep danger zones clean and dry. Meanwhile, make sure employees take proper precautions in those areas, such as slowing down motorized carts. Clean up spills and leaks immediately; don’t let them sit.

For more on how to encourage employees to pay attention to the rules under dangerous circumstances, contact the workplace experts at PSU.

Stay Safe While Operating Machinery

June 15th, 2021

We all know that sawmills and meat processing facilities are dangerous places to work. Giant spinning blades, boiling vats, and mechanized lifters and crushers are hard not to notice, and anyone with an instinct for self-preservation will increase their level of vigilance in an environment where injuries are common and obvious. But far too often, quiet and seemingly harmless machinery can lull workers into a false sense of safety and oblivion. Don’t let this happen in your workplace. Here are a few tips that keep everyone in a healthy and appropriate state of heightened awareness.

Post signs when needed, take them down when not.

Too many safety and warning signs can be more dangerous than none at all. Take a tour of your facility and review each warning sign for its level of effectiveness. Is the sign clear? Is it visible and readable? Does it make proper use of text and graphics? Tiny font, faded letting, unclear drawings, and excessive intensity can all make safety warnings useless. Fix what isn’t working, and if a machine is actually safer than the sign suggests, take the sign down. Otherwise, more important warnings will be ignored as well.

Don’t drive distracted.

Most workplace operators of forklifts, reach trucks, crushers, and conveyors are not intoxicated while on the job. But distraction and sleep deprivation are just as dangerous and are far harder to detect and prevent. Encourage your employees to use their common sense and trust their instincts if they aren’t in a safe state of mind. If an employee is ill or working on no sleep and they tell you this to protect themselves and others, thank them for their honesty and keep them away from the machine until they’re ready.

Horseplay is never okay.

Horseplay on or around dangerous machinery should never be tolerated in the workplace. Impose and follow through on strict penalties for dangerous clowning, and don’t let good cheer and friendly bonding interfere with a culture of responsibility, maturity, professionalism, and safety.

Walk the walk.

Make sure your managers and senior staff take safety rules as seriously as employees are expected to take them. There’s no excuse for walking in a hard hat zone without a hard hat, no matter how busy or important the non-wearer may consider him or herself to be.

For more on how to keep your workplace safe and your employees compliant with the rules that protect them, talk to the management experts at PSU.

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