Can Unfilled Job Posts Affect Your Business?

October 4th, 2019

A snapshot of the job market in this quarter of 2019 suggests that the competition for talent is still tight, and candidates still perceive a landscape in which their options are wide and there’s no need to settle for a role they don’t like, a company they can’t support, or a salary that doesn’t meet their needs. So what does that mean for company leaders and hiring managers who may be scrambling to fill essential positions? Here are a few key ways you may suffer if you fall behind, and a few simple moves that can prevent this from happening.

Talent Shortages Increase Hiring Costs

Hiring can be an expensive prospect in any job market, but when competition tightens and candidates hold more of the cards, the price tag naturally gets higher. Open jobs stay open longer, which can drain company resources, and the interview and selection process can involve a high number of overall candidates since more are likely to drop out of the running along the way. Employers have to work a little harder and shine a little brighter to entice candidates to apply, and of course, those who receive offers may be less likely to accept them than they would in easier markets. A competitive edge can help your company stand out.

Increased Turnover

Candidates who do respond to posts, apply, and maintain interest throughout the interview and selection process may not accept an offer, and those that do accept may not stay for more than one calendar year. This churn can interrupt the social fabric of the workplace and prevent employers from gaining a return on their investments in hiring and training.

Finding the Right Skills can be Difficult in Tight Markets

If you manage to track down candidates who hold the exact skill sets you need, these candidates are probably receiving plenty of other offers. This increases the temptation to settle and accept a shorter list of required skills, or trade one strong skill set for lesser skills in other areas. You may find yourself with a candidate who can bring some of what you need to the table, but not all.

Salary Negotiations can get Tougher

This doesn’t necessarily mean that you’ll need to pay candidates more (though that may happen). But it does mean that you’ll need to polish your offer and be willing to give a little in order to get a little. If raising salary offers isn’t easy to do, you’ll need to improve your benefits package and take a second look at the perks you can provide that other employers can’t. (Keep in mind that savvy candidates know that free coffee isn’t a perk.)

If you stay focused on the goal, make sure your workplace culture speaks for itself, and get ready to treat your employees fairly and well, you’ll thrive in a tough market. For help, turn to the experts at PSU.

What Does Your Handshake Say About You?

September 20th, 2019

At some point in the post-war 1950s, an age that left us with much of what we recognize today as “office” culture, handshakes evolved from a simple way of saying hello into a deeply nuanced and presumably meaningful form of communication.

It may have been JFK who initially infused the handshake with extra significance, or it may have been any number of self-appointed gurus who promised their audience a host of easy moves that could rocket them to top of the business ladder. But however it happened, a “firm handshake” came roaring into style. If you clutched your associate’s hand in a death grip, he or she would see you as a confident, commanding winner, an important person. Someone to be taken seriously.

But in the generations since then, we’ve all come to recognize handshakes as a form of performance and a transparent attempt to come off as winners, and we’ve all been trained to grasp tightly, just like Lee Iacocca (or whoever) told us to.

Because we’ve been taught to overthink and overperform our handshakes, there’s really only one rule for shaking hands in 2019: Don’t. If your handshake is noticeable, that’s no good. Keep your shake easy, breezy, and over. Here are a few simple ways to remove the focus from your hand and keep it on your face and voice, where it belongs.

Don’t clutch.

Pressure may have once conveyed confidence, but now it just conveys that you’re thinking really hard about the pressure of your handshake. Grip the person’s hand about as hard as you would grip the knob of a door that you’re about to open. Then release and move on.

Eye contact matters most.

Keep your eyes on the person’s eyes and smile. Repeat their name back to them as you squeeze their hand. Tell them it’s nice to see them.

A single shake and let go.

Shake once with warmth and eye contact, then let go. Don’t comment on the handshake. Don’t act impressed with its firmness. Don’t make a joke about the shake being limp or sweaty. Don’t apologize for your shake and don’t apologize for not shaking if you prefer not to shake. Don’t assume that a gentle handshake means a weak person, and don’t assume that a firm handshake means a reliable person. Assumptions like these are always wrong, and they rarely support clear communication; they only cloud it. The less said (and thought) about the shake, the better.

Don’t wipe your hand on your pants.

The reflex may be strong, especially if you’re nervous as you enter the encounter. But even if your hand comes away as clammy as a Florida swamp, wait five seconds before you attend to it.

Your associate should notice you, not your shake. Focus on the person and your relationship, not your hands. For more on how to stay cool and stay ahead, talk to the career pros at PSU.

How to Confront an Underachieving Worker without Demotivating them Further

September 6th, 2019

As you review your list of direct reports, you see one or two who stand out, but not for great reasons. For example Sally, who used to be a superstar but who just hasn’t been crushing it this week (or this year). And Steve, who showed great potential during his interview but who never seemed to fulfill that promise. His “new-hire” grace period started in 2015 and still seems to be underway.

In both cases, you know these employees well enough to know that yelling at them, criticizing them, or threatening them won’t bring the results you desire. Besides, those methods don’t reflect your style as a manager or as a person. So what should you do? How can you confront Sally and/or Steve with some rough news about their performance?  And how can you do it without making things worse?

First, look at the big picture.

If the employee is truly a drain on the company and its culture, don’t waste time asking these questions. Just gently but firmly explain that you’d like to see three specific areas of improvement within a clear time frame, or the employee will face probation and/or termination. A long-term action plan will only be necessary if the employee genuinely wants to be here, but seems to struggle with motivation.

Second, allow the employee to talk first.

Invite Steve (or Sally) into your office to talk. Ask him how he feels about his situation, his workload and his performance. Then just listen. Chances are, something is wrong. Steve may be suffering from depression or burnout. He may be facing an unresolved conflict with a coworker. He may not fully understand the parameters or expectations of the job. He may be sick or in pain. He may be disappointed that the job isn’t taking him where he’d like to go. Any of these are possible, and so are an infinite number of other options. Listen carefully before you develop the next stage of your strategy.

Be kind.

Once Sally has described her issue, pause. Recognize that your job is not to help Sally at the expense of the company. And it’s not to help the company at Sally’s expense. Your job is to use your ingenuity and management skills to identify alignment between the needs of both parties. You need to help the company gain from Sally’s labor while helping Sally feel more engaged. How can you satisfy both sides of the table? Ask for her help and input.

Do the next part on your own.

Sally may need more training, a raise, a coaching plan, a promotion, a demotion, a different office, more resources, or more support. Make a plan to provide these things. Set a timeline. Then take one step at a time toward a better and more productive relationship.

For more on how to encourage an employee while also delivering a difficult assessment of their performance, talk to the staffing team at PSU.

Can’t Seem to Focus? Here’s How to Refocus Your Energy at the Office

August 16th, 2019

The summer is here, and the weather is sunny and beautiful…outside of your office window. Everyone seems to be having fun except for you, and all the fun and inspiration seem to be happening somewhere outside of your cubicle. In fact, what may have started as a mild tendency toward daydreaming and distraction have now become genuinely concerning, since you’re staring to space on your deadlines and you sometimes complete two solid hours of work in an eight-hour day. What should you do? Try these small but helpful moves.

Get up and walk away, literally.

Forcing yourself to stay in the chair and stare at your work won’t do the trick. It may actually have the opposite effect. Why? Because the mind is just like a person, and if you force it to do something it doesn’t want to do, it will stiffen and rebel. And when this happens, if you’re a healthy, well-rounded person like most of us, the contest will not be equal. The mind will win. Decisively. So don’t go to war with it; instead, meet it halfway. Show your restless mind some respect and consideration, and later it will show the same consideration to you. Tell your boss or teammate (or whoever needs to know) that you are getting up for a while. Then get up. Don’t come back for 30 minutes.

Don’t worry about wasting time.

If you walk away from your desk for 30 minutes to make peace with your restless mind, you may fear you’re “wasting” those 30 minutes. But you aren’t. If you sat there for a half hour, glued idly to your chair, determined to engage in a losing internal wrestling match, you would truly have wasted the time. A short walk will return you to your seat rested and ready to actually do some work, for real.

Try to remember the big picture.

Let’s say you have to complete and file 30 tedious forms before the day ends. You’re unfocused and you’ve lost interest in this task, but it needs to be done. Try backing up and remembering what these forms are really for, who needs them processed, and why. Do they affect real people’s lives in a meaningful way? Recalling that meaning can help you focus and commit to the task until it’s over.

Break your big task down into smaller tasks.

When your chores seem overwhelming and your heart has punched its time card and headed home for the day (but your body still has to stay for five more hours), make this challenge a little easier by breaking it down into baby steps. Get through three of those baby steps, then stop and assess. Then go for three more. Then stop again. Keep doing this until the work is behind you.

For more on how to move forward with your day even when you’re struggling to focus, contact the workplace and career management experts at PSU.

Three Quick Tips to Bring Employees Out of Their Shell

August 2nd, 2019

Maybe you have a new employee who’s a little shy, and he or she seems unlikely to speak up in meetings, say no to an overloaded schedule, or push back against a bad idea. Maybe you have a whole team of employees who are feeling resentful but they won’t speak up and share their feelings honestly. Or maybe you have some team members who need help with a project or an issue and they don’t feel free to simply ask.

In all three cases, you’re dealing with a version of the same problem: employees who feel locked in a shell and unable or unwilling to express themselves. As a result, you’re also dealing with unaddressed workplace problems, unanswered questions, and employees who can’t get what they need because they won’t share their feelings and won’t ask for support. How can you crack those shells so everyone can move forward? Here are a few tips that can help.

Check your own mannerisms and behavior.

As a manager, do you ever express impatience or a dismissive attitude when employees say something that makes them vulnerable? Do you see weakness or incompetence in every employee who struggles with an issue or asks a question? Do you lose your temper or pout when you’re criticized? If you can say yes to any of these, ever (don’t write off an episode because it only happened once in the past), then the problem lies with you. Before you start trying to manipulate or coerce employees into sharing and speaking, change the qualities in yourself that make them hesitate.

Be warm and direct.

If you wonder why your employee isn’t asking you for something, try a novel move: just ask her. Be the first to break the ice. Don’t just act first when it comes to asking questions; you can also be proactive when it comes to sharing. Want to understand someone’s feelings or learn more about their inner lives? Share your own first. Increase your own level of disclosure and honesty and see what happens. Be generous with your thoughts, experiences, intentions, insecurities, and inner conflicts, and others will often follow your lead.

Respect sharing limits.

You’d like to get to know your new employee and you’d like to find how she really feels about her new job and workplace. So once you manage to get the ball rolling, respect her right to set limits. If she says she struggles with X but enjoys Y, take her at her word. Work on fixing X, and don’t ask any more questions about Y. If she’s not telling you the whole story, she will when she’s ready.

For more on how to encourage a culture of honesty and open communication in your workplace, reach out to the staffing pros at PSU.

Does Your Employer Value a Work-Life Balance?

July 19th, 2019

All else being equal, if most of us find ourselves choosing between an employer who values work-life balance and one who doesn’t, we’re wise to choose the first. If a company genuinely respects its employees, values their skills and contributions, wants to treat them well and honestly searches for goal alignment (instead of viewing employees as opponents, parasites or obstacles), this will show in the company’s attitude toward personal health and well-being.

A company that respects you is one you want to work for. A company that aims to bend you toward its own purposes and give as little as possible in return is one to avoid. After all, you’re likely to spend at least 40 hours with this company each week, and a little mutual regard goes a long way. Here are a few ways to conduct a work-life balance assessment before you sign on.

Listen for the actual word.

Companies that care about work-life balance use the actual term during the staffing process, and the more often and more respectfully they do so, the more likely they are to take the concept seriously. Watch out for infrequent use, and make note if you hear the term, but it’s embedded in finger quotes or subtly dismissive tones.

Scan your interviewer and other employees in the building.

During your interview, look around, and look closely. Is your interviewer truly enjoying this day, this task, and this job? Are employees in the hallways animated, bright-eyed and friendly? Or are they zoned out and beleaguered? If they seem to enjoy each other’s company and they move at a measured pace with straight backs and smiles, that’s great. If they scramble around and seem irritable or sleep deprived, that’s not so great.

Don’t share your lifestyle or family details (and pay attention if you’re asked).

You may be single, married, childless, raising kids, expecting, a grandparent, engaged, caring for a relative or any of the above, and your family status may be what drives your interest in a balanced life. If so, keep that fact to yourself during interviews. You deserve a balanced and healthy life no matter what your status looks like, and your employer does not need to know (and may NOT legally ask) about the details of your household.

Look online.

Check reviews on Glassdoor and other popular sites to find out what employees really think of the company and how they rate their relationship and experience. Read between the lines and look for specific references to long hours or disregard for personal time.

For more on how to find a great employer and build a meaningful career, turn to the staffing team at PSU.

7 Ways to Spot When Someone is Lying During an Interview

July 5th, 2019

Is your candidate blowing smoke or trying to sell you on skills, talents and a work ethic that aren’t quite what they seem? If you think you may be hearing a lot of sizzle but not seeing any steak, here are a few ways to confirm your hunch and move forward.

Implausibility plus urgency

Implausibility alone isn’t necessarily a sign of lying. Plenty of candidates have accomplishments that seem unusual or career-growth timelines that seem very short (personal assistant to senior manager in just five years?) and over-the-top claims are true more often than you might think. Urgency, a desperate demeanor or a rapid, aggressive speech pattern are also not signs of trouble on their own. But if you see all these things at the same time, the claims in question deserve a closer look.

Vague statements with no follow-up

“I led the entire team on that proposal” is a claim that sounds excellent. But then what happened? What were the circumstances? Did the candidate face any special challenges or learn any interesting lessons during that episode? If the claim appears to stand alone and getting more information feels like pulling teeth, something may be wrong.

A seemingly perfect track record or an unwillingness to recognize failure.

Strong candidates embrace their failures and understand how these episodes brought them where they are today. Questionable candidates claim to have unblemished records and see failure as something that only happens to losers—something that has never, ever happened to them. Ironically, “perfection” is a huge red flag.

Inconsistencies.

Feel free to ask questions if you hear claims, timelines or statements that conflict with others you heard earlier.

A one-sided dialogue.

Conversations always feel a bit suspect when the words flow in only one direction. If your candidate can’t change his setting from “transmit” to “receive” and you feel like you’ve been cornered by a relentless guest at a bad party, you may be on the receiving end of misinformation. Does he ever ask you any questions? Does he wait for your answer? Does he really understand and listen to your words as you speak? Or does he seem to be on stage performing a one-man show? Performers, bad conversationalists, and con artists often have one thing in common: issues with believability.

Anger

Don’t trust candidates who show anger or poor emotional control during a job interview.

Thin or ambivalent references

Be suspicious if your candidate offers few references, unreachable references, no references or references who give neutral, unenthusiastic support.

For more on how to get the most out of your candidate interviews and select only the best employees for your team, turn to the pros at PSU.

Don’t Be Afraid to Take a Temp Job

June 21st, 2019

You’re looking for work, but so far, you’ve avoided any job description or recruiter post that has the words “temporary” or “temp-to-hire” in the text. And you haven’t yet sought out a recruiting agency that can pair you with a position since you assume these pairings won’t involve permanent roles. Here are a few reasons to reconsider your approach. Temporary jobs may not be what you think, and contract or temporary placements aren’t what they were a generation ago. It’s time to take a closer look.

Say goodbye to the typing pool.

You may be held back by an outdated vision of what “temp” jobs really are. Yes, some of these roles may be short-term clerical positions that will have you in and out the door, filing forms for a week and then leaving you back at square one. But most of them are professional positions (programmers, software developers, designers, implementors, market strategists and financial analysts) in which you’ll be carefully reviewed by an employer with eyes toward a long-term relationship. Temps are not just placeholders; they’re candidates for permanent roles.

Don’t be afraid.

Some job seekers avoid temp opportunities because they don’t want to lose control of their career paths. They fear that signing a temporary contract will derail their search, cause them to miss other opportunities and require hard work that leads to a dead end. First, no role is a dead end. A six-month contract role is the best possible networking opportunity, even if it doesn’t lead to a full-time job. And the role WILL likely lead to a full-time job if you like the workplace and develop a productive relationship with your employer.

Stability comes from agility.

Here’s another outdated idea: Long-term roles are stable, unshakable paths that lead straight to comfort, security, complacency and a well-funded retirement. The reality: no job is permanent. Nothing is guaranteed forever, and in 2019, the strongest form of stability doesn’t come from a job with the word “full-time” in the description; it comes from staying light on your feet, ready for change and secure in your own skills and adaptability. Modern-day job security isn’t like a building with a deep foundation. It’s more like a boat at sea, well-built, buoyant and ready to roll with the waves.

Move forward, don’t stand still.

Before you pass up a temporary role and hold out for something long term, consider the opportunity costs that come from staying on the market for another few weeks or months. Will your eventual salary be high enough to cover that lost time? Maybe. But you’ll likely be better off if you start working as soon as possible and make real-time decisions and direction changes as you move forward. Temp jobs provide options, opportunities, new skills and new professional connections. But they also provide something even more valuable: a paycheck. Contact the staffing team at PSU to learn more.

Team Builders Don’t Always Have to Involve Alcohol

June 7th, 2019

Here’s a short story about Ed, a department manager at a regional publishing company. Ed worked hard every day to do right by his team, and he tried his best to give them everything he had as a boss, coach, and mentor. In addition to reading every management blog he could find, he arranged fun activities to support bonding outside the workplace, including the creation of a company softball team.

Every spring Saturday, the team hit the field, and Ed brought the balls, bats, and a cooler full of beer, exactly one beer for each participant. Ed worried endlessly about the cooler and its contents. Would each person be sure to have their single beer? Would they like the brand? Would it be cold enough? Would the event be fun without becoming dangerous? Would everyone stay safe and drive sober? If someone got hurt, would the company’s insurance cover it? Would Ed get in trouble with the corporate office? Each time he packed the cooler, he worried and worried.

Each time he hit the field with the team, they all had fun. With all the swinging bats, fly ball catches, laughter, outs and home runs, memories were made. But Ed still worried.

One day, he forgot the cooler and left it at home by accident. He felt terrible! Would the team ever forgive him? Would they mope and sulk?

They didn’t! They played in the sun, joked and shared stories. And not one person mentioned the missing cooler. From that day on, Ed decided to leave the cooler behind every Saturday.

Literally nothing changed.

The lesson: Nobody needed that company-sponsored beer after all. Later, Ed found it easier to plan events for the team, since he stopped making alcohol an essential part of every gathering. After a few months, the savings added up. But nothing else changed. In fact, Ed began to schedule events at places that didn’t involve alcohol at all, like mini-gold courses and ice cream shops. Outing options expanded and the team loved it. They began starting activities on their own, like book clubs and stream clean-ups. And all of them lived—and worked—happily ever after.

Do you really need alcohol at all of your company events? If you aren’t sure, try cutting back or removing booze from a few select events altogether. See what happens. Chances are, your employees will miss this minor detail less than you anticipate. They’ll keep showing up and they’ll keep having a good time, booze or no booze. And the next morning they’ll arrive at the office with clear heads, ready for the day.

Need more encouragement or ideas? Contact the staffing team at PSU!

Why Finding a Job in North Carolina Might Be the Perfect Opportunity for You!

May 24th, 2019

Are you looking for a job and willing to relocate to an exciting state with booming economic opportunities? Of course you are! There’s no need to stay in one place forever, and the more you see of the world, the more chance you’ll have to build strong professional relationships, see new sides of your industry, explore new cultures and make sure you aren’t missing out on exciting chapter of life. Here’s why you may want to consider a job in North Carolina.

The reviews are in.

Why move? Because surveys and reviewers have spent time gathering the data and the numbers don’t lie. US News recently ranked the Raleigh-Durham area as one of the best job markets and best places to live in the United States. Wallet Hub, Zippia and Indeed.com also gave high marks to NC, which makes sense, since our state offers several of the nation’s fastest-growing metro areas.

You’re looking for work in healthcare.

The most popular and highest-paying opportunities in North Carolina cover the standard spectrum (CEOs and marketing managers do well here, as they do everywhere). But the true hot button industry in the state appears to be healthcare. Internists, OBGYNs, surgeons, psychiatrists and dentists thrive in the state, and prospects for these roles seem to be growing as the population expands.

A reasonable cost of living.

Charlotte and Raleigh both have populations of about a half million people (400,000 and 800,000 respectively), which means they have culture, history, events, art and plenty to see and do. But they’re also both surprisingly livable. To get by comfortably in either city, a Huffington Post study recommends a household income of about $53,000 per year. If you’re targeting a position in any of NC’s booming industries, from healthcare to the arts, you should be able to thrive here and save a little for your retirement.

The landscape is beautiful.

North Carolina offers the natural beauty of the coast, plus history, architecture and old-world charm. If you don’t like winter and you’d rather enjoy the beach than shovel snow, this is the state for you!

You have plenty of help.

If you’re heading to North Carolina in search of job opportunities and a fun, active lifestyle, you won’t have to navigate the transition alone. Contact the team at PSU and we’ll connect you to an employer in your chosen field and help you start working your way up the ladder.

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