Win Talent from Your Competitors

October 6th, 2017

Competing for talent can be easy when the job market stalls and unemployment begins to push both the numbers and qualifications of job seekers. But when the tables turn (as they’ve been doing for the last several years since our recovery from the economic downturn), job seekers hold more of the cards. And when job seekers hold the cards, convincing them to sign on may mean drawing them away from your competitors.

This is not to be confused with “poaching” or directly approaching employed workers and trying to pull them out of their seats. Leave that process to someone else, and focus your energy on grabbing the attention of top talent before they sign a contract or accept an offer. Gain a legitimate edge over your competition during the job search, interview and negotiation process. Here’s how.

Make a better case.

Start by understanding the kind of case your competitors will present. If they can offer benefits, offer better ones. If they can offer salaries in the low sixties, aim for the high sixties. And if you can’t outbid them in terms of monetary compensation, find other ways to identify and then reach beyond whatever they put on the table. For example, maybe you can’t match their salary offers, but you might be able to provide flexible scheduling, transit discounts, or a more rewarding workplace culture.

Get to know your candidate.

If you open the conversation by listening instead of talking, you may gain a complete understanding of what your candidate actually wants and needs at this point in her career. Maybe they’re looking for something exactly like their last job, but closer to home. Maybe they are gunning for management and they’re willing to put up with a long commute in order to get there. Maybe they have an interest in a certain type of experience, exposure, or industry mentoring. If you can identify this goal and help your candidate get there, this one detail may help you overcome deficiencies in other areas of your offer.

Establish a partnership.

Maybe you can’t give your candidate everything they want right now, but if they step on board and help you grow your business, you’ll have the resources to drive their career forward in a year or two. Don’t make promises you can’t keep, but if you can both support each other’s goals, make this point clear.

Identify deficiencies in their last role.

Why did they leave their last job? If they left because the culture was toxic, build a case around your positive team energy and commitment to employee growth. If they left because they were passed over for a promotion, explain how your company can provide them with opportunities for advancement.

For more on how to attract, onboard and retain the best talent in the marketplace, turn to the Cleveland County staffing and recruiting experts at PSU.

How Does Change Impact Your Workforce?

February 19th, 2016

When you lose a valuable employee and hire a replacement, how do your teams typically react? If your company is like most, the answer probably depends on the person’s position and level of influence, but it may also depend on the general fabric of your workplace culture. When it comes to the unrest associated with turnover, there’s a trade-off at work: If your teams are tightly knit and your workplace feels like family, turnover can bring a higher level of upheaval. But if your employees tend to come and go with little impact—as if moving through a revolving door, unknown and unnoticed– there’s a chance your culture can use some work. Here are a few things to consider as you try to keep change from derailing your productivity.

Give plenty of warning.

When a valued employee gives notice and you know that the departure of this person might lead to a general unraveling, let affected employees know right away. Be as discreet as you need to, but don’t waste any time putting a plan in place that can sidestep potential bottle necks and avoid the confusion that’s likely to take place in this person’s absence.

Train pro-actively

If the new employee will be taking over for someone with complex responsibilities and years of accumulated organizational knowledge, think ahead. How can you get this person up and running as soon as possible? Keep your expectations reasonable, prioritize the things they’ll need to learn, and leverage the departing employee’s help as much as possible before her final day. Ask her to create the clearest possible description of her daily responsibilities and use any available overlapping time to pair her with the new employee for shadowing and mentoring.

Enlist the help of your teams

The new employee may not be able to shoulder the entire load of the new position on the very first day, but with a little teamwork, the group can still make it through the transition with minimal errors and oversights. Encourage peer groups to work together to support and inform the new employee when the need arises.

Put everything in writing

Smoother transitions and rapid learning curves take place when new employees don’t have to remember every detail. Present the incoming person with as much written material about the job as possible, including access to binders or websites (or both) where he can turn for information about company policies and job responsibilities.

Foster a healthy and productive workplace culture.

If your employees are burned out, over-worked, hyper competitive, solitary, or just plain self-involved, expect rocky transitions—and lots of them. Unhappy teams mean high turnover, and those turnovers won’t go well if your teams aren’t dialed in to those around them. Encourage collaboration, shared goals, communication, and general friendliness and you’ll have an easier time bridging the gap between one tenure and the next.

For more on how to build a positive and productive workplace culture, reach out to the Shelby staffing experts at PSU.

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