Working with a Recruiter: How to Get More Out of Your Relationship

April 16th, 2018

If you’re a job seeker, recruiters probably approach you and step into your life through either of two avenues: either you find them or they find you. If you connect with a staffing agency directly (which should definitely be a key element in your job search strategy), you’ll be connected with a team member who will take your information, learn more about you and what you’re looking for, and maybe provide you with a skills test so they can present your results to interested employers.

If a recruiter approaches you, that means you’ll probably receive a call or email from a stranger who found your resume through a job board database, a company database, or a colleague. The person will check in with you to assess your level of interest and availability, and the two of you can take the relationship from there. In either case, a few simple moves can help you form a fruitful connection and bring you closer to your next great job.

First, answer quickly.

If your recruiter sends you a job post that looks amazing, answer right away. Positions close quickly, and the responsive bird gets the worm. The email you receive may have been sent to literally dozens of other seekers at the same time, so if you don’t answer, somebody else will.

If you aren’t interested, move on.

If your recruiter shows you a job that looks perfect, minus a few negotiable issues (a low starting salary, a full time schedule when you’re looking for part-time) answer and explain what you need. But if the job is a non-negotiable “no” (way too far outside of your commuting range, for example), don’t waste the recruiter’s time. Respond promptly by saying you’d like to be kept in the loop on similar jobs, but not this one.

Don’t take anything personally.

If your recruiter doesn’t answer you right away or works to get you into a position that just doesn’t materialize, shrug it off. Keep in mind that the recruiter wants to find a position that is a good fit for you and for the employer.

Be honest, direct, and clear about what you want.

Your recruiter wants you to succeed, and they want only the best for the company that hires you. Do help them to help you by being clear and straightforward. If you don’t want a certain set of traits from a job, say so. And if you hold some qualifications but not others, let them know. Relentless positivity won’t get you where you want to go, but honest conversations will.

For more on how to help your recruiter to help you, contact the job search professionals at PSU.

Successfully Preparing for a Career Fair

April 2nd, 2018

When you see an announcement for a career fair in your area, don’t just dismiss it without taking a closer look. Even if you’re happily employed, or you’re actively seeking work but you don’t think this particular fair has anything to offer you, look again. Some career fairs showcase a surprisingly diverse group of employers from different industries, and you never know when a job fair might light a spark or introduce you to an important new contact. Opportunities are everywhere! And career fairs often become sources of kismet and coincidence that can change lives. If you decide to show up on the scheduled date and time, keep these tips in mind.

Dress nicely.

Look sharp, since you’ll be interacting with lots of people who will see you for only a few seconds and will have little else to go on while gathering a first impression. Eye contact and a pleasant expression will go a long way as well.

Take it in.

Keep your head up and feel the vibe in the room. Scan for friendly faces and keep your ears open. If you overhear a conversation that intrigues you, it’s okay to drop in. As in, “Excuse me, did you just say you know Sally Johnson? I know her too,” or, “Excuse me, did you just mention the X corporation? I have a connection there and he has a position he urgently needs to fill.” Don’t stare at your phone and tune out the world. At a career fair, this can lead to missing out, missing the point, and missing your moment.

Be patient and calm.

Desperation is unfortunate, since it can actually keep the things we desperately need away from us instead of drawing them closer. Even a vague sense of restless urgency can come across poorly and can be off-putting. So relax. Prepare to wait in some long lines. Don’t demand anyone’s attention or validation, and don’t say “I’m sorry” when you actually mean to say “Hello” or “Here’s my resume” or “It’s nice to meet you” or “I’m looking for a full-time position as a senior market analyst.” Anxious people do this all the time at job fairs, but you don’t have to be one of them.

Bring lots of resumes.

You’ll probably distribute your resume to some employers via app, email, or the cloud. But bring a stack of old-fashioned paper resumes with you as well, and try to leave as many behind as possible. Again, stay open minded about the specifics of the job or company you’d like to work for. If a certain employer might be a good fit but you aren’t sure, err on the side of leaving a resume. You can always discuss your credentials with the company in detail later on.

For more on how to make the most of your job fair experience, whether you stay for three hours or three minutes, contact the staffing and job experts at PSU.

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