Engage Your Employees and Reduce Turnover

May 18th, 2018

If you’re still reeling from the last resignation notice you received when the next departing employee shows up in your office to break the news, you may be dealing with more than just a bad week. You may have a serious turnover problem. If you keep losing valued and trusted employees, and you’re seeing promising new hires come onboard only leave within a single year, take a close look at your engagement strategy. Don’t ask how you’re losing them; ask what you’re doing to keep them. Start with a few simple moves that keep your employees loyal even when they’re lured away by other offers.

Provide something your competitors can’t.

Every workplace culture is different, so what does your culture have to offer that others don’t? What sets you apart? Is it an inspiring, collaborative atmosphere where great ideas come to life? Is your workplace friendly and welcoming? Can your teams trust and count on each other during times of stress? Do your workers think of each other as friends and family? Maybe your culture has an elite, driven vibe that makes employees proud to be part of the energy, or maybe your workplace is goofy and fun loving. Work to bring out the best in your culture and dial down the worst.

Do your workers feel appreciated?

After a long hard week of dedication to a project, there’s nothing quite like having the project cut from the final proposal and swept off the table without a word of acknowledgement from upper management. Of course the employee who put in that work will be paid either way, but sometimes work isn’t just about the money. When your teams go the extra mile, make note of it and thank them, regardless of the long-term results for the company.

Listen to their needs and interests.

Encourage your employees to share with you when it comes to their career plans, their personal goals, the subjects they’d like to learn about, and the things they hope to get out of their relationship with your company. As you help them to excel as employees and contributors, make sure they’re also satisfied with their side of the equation. They should be getting returns from the job that are equal to their contributions and sacrifices. If they aren’t, make note of it and provide them with training, compensation and support before they find another employer who can give them what they aren’t getting from you.

Resolve conflicts before they drive employees away.

Sometimes employees leave due to unmanageable conflicts or constant exposure to toxic people. And when this happens, you’ll probably never know. Exit interviews rarely contain statements like “I didn’t get along with my officemate” or “I had to work every day beside a real jerk.” Keep an eye out for these kinds of problems and fix them before they push talented workers out the door.

For more on how to keep engagement high and turnover as low as possible, turn to the Cleveland County management professionals at PSU.

How to Move Forward After Being Fired

May 4th, 2018

You’ve just been fired, and you’re ready to count this episode among the hardest you’ve ever faced in your life. You’re not alone; according to survey data, most respondents rank job loss among the ten most difficult life challenges most of us will ever encounter, almost on par with divorce, losing a home, or losing a loved one. Job loss is stressful in countless ways, some of which compound the difficulty of losing a paycheck. Breaking the news to family members, finding ways to pay the bills, and explaining the event to interviewers in the future are all difficult tasks, and there’s no way to sugarcoat the truth: the road ahead will be rocky. At least for a little while. But you can make it, and in time, you’ll be back on your feet with this rough patch well behind you. Here are a few ways to make that day come a little sooner.

You’re not alone.

You may feel embarrassed by this event, as if you’ve been exposed as a bad worker or a fraud. But that’s simply not the case. Firing (as painful as it is) is quite common, and the reasons can have little to do with your ability to make it in the world. There’s often a case to be made that the event wasn’t completely your fault. Spend two minutes thinking about that, and then put it behind you. You have bigger concerns then placing blame—on yourself or on anyone else.

Don’t wallow.

You may be tempted to spend weeks sweeping up the pieces of your broken heart, but don’t do this. As soon as you’re able, get outside, exercise, search for a new job, or plan your next adventure. The longer you sit still, the more your dark thoughts and ruminations deepen the hole you’re in. It’s healthy to ruminate after the loss of a loved one, and our memories keep loved ones alive and with us. But a job is not a person. Your ruminations won’t honor the past or help you heal. Bring the wallowing stage to a close asap. After a job loss, this stage helps no one.

Take the opportunity to change course.

Before you leap into a new job exactly like the last one, think of this moment as an off-ramp on an expressway. If there’s a chance that your previous jobs or career path weren’t quite right for you, act on that possibility before the moment passes and you miss your exit. Career pivots are always easier when your old job disappears involuntarily. It’s much harder to stand up from your desk and force the move on your own.

Get help.

Whether you’re changing direction or just getting back on track, you’ll benefit from the words and guidance of career experts who have seen it all before. Contact the Charlotte staffing professionals at PSU for perspective, tips, and job search resources that will help you regain your stride.

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