Why You Should Work With a Recruiter

October 26th, 2018

You may be searching for a new job and not finding success just yet. Or you may be scouring the market and not finding a job match that’s quite right for you. Or you may be experiencing a little bit of both. In any case, if you haven’t started working with a professional recruiter, now may be a great time to start. A recruiter can add energy and focus to your search, and their years on the job and deep experience with searches just like yours can help you reach heights you wouldn’t be able to reach on your own. Here’s how.

Recruiters can find job openings you can’t find on your own

Not every job is publicly posted on a website you happen to use. And no matter how wide your social network may be, your recruiter’s network is wider AND more relevant to your job search. Most recruiters have been in the business for a long time. They can access and open doors you may not even be able to see.

Recruiters know their clients better than you do

You may find an open job with your target company … but other than the information you find online, you don’t know very much about the company, or the hiring manager, at all. Here’s a tip: Your recruiter does. They can help you make a connection with a certain employer by highlighting your most relevant accomplishments and skills.

Recruiters can advocate for you

Advocating for yourself is a necessary skill during your job search, but it’s not easy. Making your own personal sales pitch will always be an uphill climb. When you have others who speak for you and can provide support and testimonials, you move from the stairs to the escalator. Your recruiter can present you to their clients and make sure they see your best qualities.

Recruiters can steer you away from trouble and wasted time

If you’re barking up the wrong tree, or chasing a job that just isn’t a match, your recruiter can often see it before you do. Sometimes the salary will be far too low. Or the advancement opportunities won’t take you where you’d like to go. Or the employers need a skill set you simply don’t have. Your recruiter can find you something better.

Recruiters can help you polish your resume

When your recruiter gives you advice about your resume, you’re wise to take it. Again, they know what your target employers are looking for and what they need to see.

For more on how to connect with a recruiter and boost your job search, turn to the experts at PSU.

 

How to Master the Interview

June 22nd, 2018

Despite what some employers want you to believe, most job interviews are more-or-less the same. Some employers want you to assume that an interview with their unique company represents a special opportunity to connect in a special way with a special enterprise. Of course that isn’t true; most companies develop their interview process using research, trial and error, and careful observation of the interviews conducted by other successful companies. As a result, nothing they do is new or special, and every question and observation they apply during the process will be drawn from a long-established set of patterns and formulas.

The good news for job seekers: If employer interviews are research-and-formula based, then employee interviews can (and should) be as well. There’s a science to this process, and a method that works in one case will likely work almost everywhere. This is a dance with known and recognized steps. Learn the steps and you’ll do well with almost every interviewer you encounter. Here are a few things to keep in mind.

Settle down.

This tip applies across every industry from food service to surgery. When you’re nervous and uncomfortable, you make others nervous and uncomfortable. But when you relax, you make others feel relaxed and happy. If you can’t calm your nerves or steady your shaking hands by forcing yourself to do so, start thinking of the process as a favor to your interviewer. Help them. Make them feel at ease. Let your calm demeanor reassure them. Turn the tables, even if only in your mind.

Focus on a few key points, not a huge file download.

An interview is a conversation, not a massive exchange of data and information. You don’t need to tell your interviewer about every single accomplishment or A plus you’ve ever earned. They won’t remember these details anyway. Touch on some highlights (maybe two or three) and don’t worry about the rest. If you’re scrambling to blurt a laundry list of facts about yourself and you’re so focused on transmitting that you aren’t listening to your interviewer, something is wrong. Think of the interview as a date. If the two of you enjoy the conversation, you’ll have plenty of time later on to share more facts and details.

Look and sound trustworthy.

When we meet someone new, most of us want to look and speak in a way that makes us seem friendly, stable and pleasant. But in an interview, there’s one quality that exceeds these others in weight and value: trustworthiness. Before you convince your employer that you can expertly remove a gall bladder or design a website, you need to convince them that you will show up every day and present yourself honestly. You’ll do your best and you won’t embarrass the company. If you hit the mark, you won’t have to say these things because your voice, clothing and body language will send the message for you.

For more on how to master the basics and make a great impression in every interview you attend, contact the team at PSU.

How to Move Forward After Being Fired

May 4th, 2018

You’ve just been fired, and you’re ready to count this episode among the hardest you’ve ever faced in your life. You’re not alone; according to survey data, most respondents rank job loss among the ten most difficult life challenges most of us will ever encounter, almost on par with divorce, losing a home, or losing a loved one. Job loss is stressful in countless ways, some of which compound the difficulty of losing a paycheck. Breaking the news to family members, finding ways to pay the bills, and explaining the event to interviewers in the future are all difficult tasks, and there’s no way to sugarcoat the truth: the road ahead will be rocky. At least for a little while. But you can make it, and in time, you’ll be back on your feet with this rough patch well behind you. Here are a few ways to make that day come a little sooner.

You’re not alone.

You may feel embarrassed by this event, as if you’ve been exposed as a bad worker or a fraud. But that’s simply not the case. Firing (as painful as it is) is quite common, and the reasons can have little to do with your ability to make it in the world. There’s often a case to be made that the event wasn’t completely your fault. Spend two minutes thinking about that, and then put it behind you. You have bigger concerns then placing blame—on yourself or on anyone else.

Don’t wallow.

You may be tempted to spend weeks sweeping up the pieces of your broken heart, but don’t do this. As soon as you’re able, get outside, exercise, search for a new job, or plan your next adventure. The longer you sit still, the more your dark thoughts and ruminations deepen the hole you’re in. It’s healthy to ruminate after the loss of a loved one, and our memories keep loved ones alive and with us. But a job is not a person. Your ruminations won’t honor the past or help you heal. Bring the wallowing stage to a close asap. After a job loss, this stage helps no one.

Take the opportunity to change course.

Before you leap into a new job exactly like the last one, think of this moment as an off-ramp on an expressway. If there’s a chance that your previous jobs or career path weren’t quite right for you, act on that possibility before the moment passes and you miss your exit. Career pivots are always easier when your old job disappears involuntarily. It’s much harder to stand up from your desk and force the move on your own.

Get help.

Whether you’re changing direction or just getting back on track, you’ll benefit from the words and guidance of career experts who have seen it all before. Contact the Charlotte staffing professionals at PSU for perspective, tips, and job search resources that will help you regain your stride.

Working with a Recruiter: How to Get More Out of Your Relationship

April 16th, 2018

If you’re a job seeker, recruiters probably approach you and step into your life through either of two avenues: either you find them or they find you. If you connect with a staffing agency directly (which should definitely be a key element in your job search strategy), you’ll be connected with a team member who will take your information, learn more about you and what you’re looking for, and maybe provide you with a skills test so they can present your results to interested employers.

If a recruiter approaches you, that means you’ll probably receive a call or email from a stranger who found your resume through a job board database, a company database, or a colleague. The person will check in with you to assess your level of interest and availability, and the two of you can take the relationship from there. In either case, a few simple moves can help you form a fruitful connection and bring you closer to your next great job.

First, answer quickly.

If your recruiter sends you a job post that looks amazing, answer right away. Positions close quickly, and the responsive bird gets the worm. The email you receive may have been sent to literally dozens of other seekers at the same time, so if you don’t answer, somebody else will.

If you aren’t interested, move on.

If your recruiter shows you a job that looks perfect, minus a few negotiable issues (a low starting salary, a full time schedule when you’re looking for part-time) answer and explain what you need. But if the job is a non-negotiable “no” (way too far outside of your commuting range, for example), don’t waste the recruiter’s time. Respond promptly by saying you’d like to be kept in the loop on similar jobs, but not this one.

Don’t take anything personally.

If your recruiter doesn’t answer you right away or works to get you into a position that just doesn’t materialize, shrug it off. Keep in mind that the recruiter wants to find a position that is a good fit for you and for the employer.

Be honest, direct, and clear about what you want.

Your recruiter wants you to succeed, and they want only the best for the company that hires you. Do help them to help you by being clear and straightforward. If you don’t want a certain set of traits from a job, say so. And if you hold some qualifications but not others, let them know. Relentless positivity won’t get you where you want to go, but honest conversations will.

For more on how to help your recruiter to help you, contact the job search professionals at PSU.

Successfully Preparing for a Career Fair

April 2nd, 2018

When you see an announcement for a career fair in your area, don’t just dismiss it without taking a closer look. Even if you’re happily employed, or you’re actively seeking work but you don’t think this particular fair has anything to offer you, look again. Some career fairs showcase a surprisingly diverse group of employers from different industries, and you never know when a job fair might light a spark or introduce you to an important new contact. Opportunities are everywhere! And career fairs often become sources of kismet and coincidence that can change lives. If you decide to show up on the scheduled date and time, keep these tips in mind.

Dress nicely.

Look sharp, since you’ll be interacting with lots of people who will see you for only a few seconds and will have little else to go on while gathering a first impression. Eye contact and a pleasant expression will go a long way as well.

Take it in.

Keep your head up and feel the vibe in the room. Scan for friendly faces and keep your ears open. If you overhear a conversation that intrigues you, it’s okay to drop in. As in, “Excuse me, did you just say you know Sally Johnson? I know her too,” or, “Excuse me, did you just mention the X corporation? I have a connection there and he has a position he urgently needs to fill.” Don’t stare at your phone and tune out the world. At a career fair, this can lead to missing out, missing the point, and missing your moment.

Be patient and calm.

Desperation is unfortunate, since it can actually keep the things we desperately need away from us instead of drawing them closer. Even a vague sense of restless urgency can come across poorly and can be off-putting. So relax. Prepare to wait in some long lines. Don’t demand anyone’s attention or validation, and don’t say “I’m sorry” when you actually mean to say “Hello” or “Here’s my resume” or “It’s nice to meet you” or “I’m looking for a full-time position as a senior market analyst.” Anxious people do this all the time at job fairs, but you don’t have to be one of them.

Bring lots of resumes.

You’ll probably distribute your resume to some employers via app, email, or the cloud. But bring a stack of old-fashioned paper resumes with you as well, and try to leave as many behind as possible. Again, stay open minded about the specifics of the job or company you’d like to work for. If a certain employer might be a good fit but you aren’t sure, err on the side of leaving a resume. You can always discuss your credentials with the company in detail later on.

For more on how to make the most of your job fair experience, whether you stay for three hours or three minutes, contact the staffing and job experts at PSU.

Stop Using Meaningless Keywords in Your Resume

March 23rd, 2018

If you’re like most job seekers, you use your resume document to present your background and qualifications in a readable, organized way, but you also work hard behind the scenes to make sure your file finds its way into the hands of recruiters and gets top billing in search results. You probably keep your phrases tightly aligned with the phrases used in your target job posts, and you probably load your document with strategic keywords.

But are you using the RIGHT keywords? Here are a few ways to make sure your keyword choices are actually helping you instead of just taking up space, or worse, holding you back.

Stay contextual.

Don’t just list a string of meaningless words across the bottom line of your resume document. Instead, take each of those words and find a place for it within your text. Human readers don’t like to be fooled into clicking on a document that isn’t as relevant as a search algorithm would suggest, and if the words you choose really are relevant, you shouldn’t have trouble building them into your profile.

Blend the broad and specific.

If you work in a very focused corner of, for example, the fashion industry, find a way to use the phrase “fashion industry” in your profile. While some of searches conducted by recruiters will be narrow, others will be wide, and some recruiters will be looking for your document in a huge database that covers job seekers in every imaginable sector. Don’t miss a chance to stand out.

Include these three phrases, always.

No matter what else you include in your resume, always mention 1) your target job title, 2) your geographic area, and 3) your industry. For example, “Associate Account Manager”, “Auto Sales”, and “Seattle, WA”. Or “Veterinary Technician”, “Animal Health”, and “Boston Metro Area”. These phrases are used by almost all hiring mangers and recruiters during the early stages of the search, especially if they’re sourcing candidates online. Again, don’t miss an easy opportunity to get yourself into the running.

Don’t game the system.

Some clever moves may propel you through the first stages of the search process, but they might also upset the human readers that stand at the final gates. For example, if you add skills, degrees, licenses and qualifications to your document that you don’t actually hold, but you place them in white text so they can be seen only by digital readers and not by humans, you may fool the system and get your document into the final round. But you won’t go beyond that point, and you may harm your professional reputation in the process.

For more on how to use resume keywords to your advantage, turn to the job search experts at PSU.

Don’t Let Change Set You Back

February 2nd, 2018

Change can be exciting and being pushed outside of our comfort zones can be the first step on an exhilarating adventure. But ask any camper caught in rainstorm with a leaky tent and they’ll tell you: adventures aren’t always fun while you’re having them. The most meaningful, transformative and valuable experiences of our lives are often brought on by moments of major change. And these moments, while they’re taking place, can be distinctly unsettling and unpleasant.

If you’re reluctant to throw yourself into the unknown or you tend to back away from change because the difficulty of the experience doesn’t seem worth the ultimate reward, take a minute to rethink that position. Only by embracing new situations can we leave the old ones behind and evolve as employees and as people. Keep these thoughts in mind.

Chances are, you’re not the first person ever to face this situation.

No matter what you’re going through—or what you’re about to go through—you’re not Magellan. You aren’t a pioneer facing an unknown wilderness. There are plenty of people around you who have taken this step before and come out alive on the other side. Make an effort to find out who they are and where they are. If you can, try to glean something from their experience that might inform your own.

Fear causes more problems than the thing you’re afraid of.

Fear is a real thing, and unfortunately, it’s an instinct that pushes us into the path of harm just as often (or more often) than it saves us. Fear can cause an elevated heart rate and shallow breathing, but it can also cause poor judgement. Desperation rarely leads to wise decisions. When fear takes over, find a way to center yourself, deepen your breathing, and retake control of your destiny. Push out phrases like “This offer stinks, but I’ll never get anything better” or “I should hedge my bets or this situation might end in disaster.” Stay calm; disaster and doom are less likely than your fear would have you believe.

Focus on what lies on the other side.

Change is like a wall of thorns, or a moat full of crocodiles, or journey over a snowy mountain, or…you get the idea. The point is, there are difficult obstacles in your path, for sure, but if you focus on the gains that lie beyond the challenge, you’ll get there faster. You’ll also enjoy the experience more.

Help yourself by helping others.

If you’re facing your difficult transition by yourself, that’s one thing, but if you’re making this journey with other people around you, focus on their struggles, not your own. Make the process easier for them. Coach them, rally them, find solutions to their problems and ease for their worries, and you’ll find that your own worries seem to diminish.

For more on how to navigate a difficult change, contact the Cleveland County career management professionals at PSU.

Battling Job Search Burnout

January 5th, 2018

Job search burnout: the struggle is real. Even when the job market is booming and unemployment is low—in fact, ESPECIALLY when these conditions are in effect—an extended job search can be morally, financially, and even physically exhausting (ask any anxious person who hasn’t slept in a few days). After a seemingly endless series of rejections or disappointing feedback from disinterested employers, it’s natural to start looking around for other ways to spend the day, and if job seekers don’t recognize the signs of burnout, they may be tempted to simply stop looking for work and abandon the process, regardless of the consequences.

But giving up isn’t the answer, especially if it means a stalled career or remaining trapped in an unrewarding job that adds no value to your career. Before you’re overtaken by burnout, recognize the signs and fight back.

Don’t be relentless.

If you berate yourself for every minute that you spend awake and not looking for work, stop doing that. The job search is NOT a full-time job, counter to what you might believe. Set aside one hour, or four, or 30 minutes every day to work on your resume, and when that period ends, pack it up. Recharge your battery, turn your attention back to your current job, or spend time with friends and family.

Drop the pressure or you may be tempted to drop your standards.

If you’ve decided that your job search is a “failure” after a month goes by and you don’t have a new gig, the artificial deadline you’ve imposed may push you to make desperate decisions, and desperate decisions are rarely smart decisions. Don’t accept an absurd commute, impossible hours, or a salary that’s less than you deserve. Settle in for a long climb; you’ll get there when you get there. You won’t get there at all if you panic, give up, and accept a job you don’t want.

Get help from a recruiter.

If you feel like you’re getting tired and losing the energy and optimism you had at the beginning of your job search, it may be time to seek help from an expert outside source. An experienced, established recruiter with wide and deep connections in your industry and your geographic area can help you find and impress the employer who’s looking for you right now just as urgently as you’re looking for them. In the meantime, your recruiter can help you polish your resume and your pitch until they’re tightly targeted to your ideal opportunity.

Contact our Cleveland County career management experts at PSU to learn more!

Jump Into 2018 With a Plan

December 15th, 2017

The new year is appearing around the bend, and every time the clock resets and the confetti rains down, we all get a chance to start over. It’s a time for new begins, a time to let go of our past mistakes and move forward with our hearts set on better decisions and a brighter future.

In the career management world, this tends to mean one of two things: Either you’re leaving your old job behind and searching for a new one, or you’re buckling down and redoubling your commitment to the job you have. Either you’re facing a transition and 2018 will bring you into a new workplace, or you’re looking for ways to reengage with your current role and bring new passion to your daily tasks.

In either case, the STAR goal-setting system can help. During the remaining days of this year, star putting together a plan based on the STAR acronym and you’ll cross the threshold into next year with your path laid and your ambitions blazing. Keep your goals:

Specific

Instead of setting countless ambiguous goals like “Become more proactive” or “Start Self-Promoting”, try shortening the list and keep each item concrete and specific. Instead of becoming “more proactive”, set your sites on the specific actions you plan to execute each day. Try: “Send out five resumes each day, 25 per week”, or “Contact three network connections by phone each week”. If your plan emphasizes engagement at your current job, try this: “Ask for feedback twice each week” or “Ask to be assigned to the Jones project”. General efforts toward self-promotion might include: “Send out three manuscripts each week to potential agents” or “Start a blog and post one entry per week.”

Trackable

Measure your progress toward your goals as you move through the year. And if this seems impossible, adjust your goals so you can attach numbers to your definition of success. If you’d like to make more sales, track your increased cold calls and presentations. If you’d like to land more interviews, start with your baseline (four per month, for example) and raise that number to five.

Achievable

Unattainable goals are a fast track to discouragement. No matter what you decide to do, break your large goals into milestones, and make sure each milestone isn’t so ambitious that it’s unrealistic. If one of your milestones feels like a stretch, break it down into two or three smaller ones.

Relevant

Keep every step of your path focused toward a realistic and meaningful vision of yourself and your career. Don’t get so bogged down in the details that you forget the larger picture and get lost along the way. For more guidance as you lay out your plan for 2018, contact the career management experts at PSU.

Damage Control: Turn Your Mistake Around Quickly

November 17th, 2017

So you made a mistake on the job. And this time, your blunder wasn’t a minor typo or misunderstanding that could happen to anyone; it was a big deal. A really big deal. You have no easy excuse, since this blunder really was your fault and you passed up at least one opportunity to prevent it from happening. You also have no advocates rushing to your defense, since your teammates and coworkers don’t share culpability and may not even fully understand what went wrong. You’re alone, you screwed up, and you have nobody to blame but yourself. So what now?

Here are a few ways you can turn this epic crash landing into a long-term win for your career. All hope is not lost, but you’ll have to take a few critical steps—and you’ll need to take them now—if you intend to make a graceful recovery.

First, be patient.

The road back from a blunder like this will probably be long and winding. Don’t expect instant results and instant forgiveness, no matter what you do. Plan for the long term, and set a reasonable expectation. For example, you may not put this entirely behind you and return to a new normal within the next month, or even the next year. Settle in for a long climb.

Second, think about others around you.

Did your mistake hurt anyone other than yourself? Did you make someone else look bad? Did you compromise someone else’s career prospects? Did your blunder put someone’s life or health at risk? Did you undo hours or years of someone else’s hard work? If so, gather your courage, face this person (or people) and set things right. Own what you did, apologize sincerely, and if you don’t know how to get back what the person lost, ask.

If you lost your job, don’t sit still.

It’s easy to give in to despair if you find yourself happily employed on Monday and home in the middle of the day on Tuesday. But don’t wallow. Talk to a legal expert if you may have been treated unfairly, and again, if you hurt someone, do your best to set things right. Start putting together a job search plan and as you sell yourself to prospective employers, be ready to explain what you learned from this incident and how it helped you grow. You’re not a bad person, you just made a bad mistake. This incident does not define you. Give yourself one day to brood, then get moving.

For more on how to keep a workplace mistake from creating long term damage to your career and your life, turn to the Cleveland County recruiting and job search experts at PSU.

©Year Personnel Services Unlimited, Inc.
All Rights Reserved. Site Credits.